Other Events

Human Rights Roundtable

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Status: 
Accepted
Workshop Theme: 
Other Events
Concise Description of Workshop: 

 

Organiser(s) Name: 

 

During the IGF MAG meeting held in May 2012 in Geneva, several ways to develop the cross-cutting issues (human rights and development) were proposed. Particularly,  the group in charge of structuring the Taking Stock and the Way Forward session suggested that the second part of the session includes feedback from the cross-cutting

themes which could be developed through round tables. It was supported by other MAG members (see transcripts MAG meeting 17 May)[1].

Previous Workshop(s): 

If No - please mention NA here

Submitted Workshop Panelists: 

To be Provided

Arab IGF

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Status: 
Accepted
Workshop Theme: 
Other Events
Concise Description of Workshop: 

The Arab IGF was established in February 2012 as a result of a multistakeholder consultation under the joint umbrella of UN-ESCWA and the League of Arab States, following several activities within the framework of the two organizations. The Arab IGF aims at putting a platform in place for all stakeholders in the Arab region to openly discuss Internet-related public policy matters, and to exchange best practices, with the objective of reaching a more globalized governance of the Internet, and to promote access, security, stability and development of the Internet.

Organiser(s) Name: 

Arab IGF Secretariat – Hisham Aboulyazed

Previous Workshop(s): 

NA

Submitted Workshop Panelists: 

Moderator: Hisham Aboulyazed, Senior Coordinator of the Arab IGF, Cairo

  • Ayman El-Sherbiny, Chief, ICT Policies, ESCWA, Beirut
  • Christine Arida, Telecom Services Planning Manager, NTRA, Cairo
  • Emily Taylor, ICT consultant, UK 
  • Hanane Boujemi, Hivos, Morocco/The Hague
  • Khaled Foda, Head of the ICT Department, League of Arab States
  • Paul Rendek, RIPE NCC, Dubai
  • Qusai Al-Shatti, Deputy Chairman, KITS, Kuwait
Name of Remote Moderator(s): 
Bernard Sadaka (TBC)

Africa Internet Governance Forum

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Status: 
Accepted
Workshop Theme: 
Other Events
Concise Description of Workshop: 

The Africa Internet Governance Forum (AfIGF) was launched on 30 September 2011, at a workshop organized by ECA and the African Union Commission (AUC) held during the 6th IGF in Nairobi, to act as a platform for an inclusive multilateral, multi-stakeholder and multilingual discussion on issues pertinent to the Internet in Africa in general and Internet Governance issues in particular. As stated in its terms of reference, the AfIGF shall meet every year at different venue in each region and at the IGF venue and wherever possible during Multi-stakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) consultations.

Organiser(s) Name: 

Egypt: Chair of AfIGF represented by Ms. Nermine Sadani United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) represented by Mr. Makane Faye African Union Commission (AUC) represented by Mr. Moctar Yedaly Free Software and Open Source Foundation for Africa (FOSSFA) represented by Nnenna Nwakanma

Previous Workshop(s): 
Submitted Workshop Panelists: 

Mr Makane Faye, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa Mr Moctar Yedaly, African Union Commission Ms Nermine Sadani, Egypt and Chair of AfIGF Ms Alice Munya, East Africa Internet Governance Forum Mr Baudin Schombe, Central Africa Internet Governance Forum Ms Towela Nyirenda-Jere, Southern Africa Internet Governance Forum Ms Nnenna Nwakanma, West Africa Internet Governance Forum AfriNic Representative Africa Undersea Cable Representative Selected representatives of national IGFs in Africa A representative each from European, Asian and Latin American Stakeholders

Name of Remote Moderator(s): 
Judy Anne Okite, Internet Governance Facilitator, Free and Open Source Software Foundation for Africa (FOSSFA)
Transcript: 

5 years EuroDIG

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Status: 
Accepted
Workshop Theme: 
Other Events
Theme Question: 

Resume of the Stockholm meeting and looking forward to Lisbon 2013
 
 

Concise Description of Workshop: 

Internet has become an integral part of our lives and is shaping our society. But are we as a society governing the Internet in a wise way? Do we all accept our responsibilities to safeguard the continued development of the Internet as a global, inclusive, open and safe virtual environment? Do we ensure that our European values are reflected in the written and unwritten rules governing the Internet? And who sets the rules?

Organiser(s) Name: 

Sandra Hoferichter, EuroDIG Secretariat Germany
Wolf Ludwig, EuroDIG Secretariat Switzerland

Submitted Workshop Panelists: 

Anders Johanson, PTS, Sweden
Lee Hibbard, Council of Europe, France
Thomas Schneider, OFCOM Switzerland
Wolf Ludwig, EuroDIG Secretariat
Pedro Veiga, Foundation for Scientific Computation (FCCN), Portugal
Ana Neves, Foundation for Science and Technology
Megan Richards, European Commission, Belgium
Representatives from national European IG initiatives (Ukraine, Finland, Norway, Portugal, Sweden among others)
Moderator: Sandra Hoferichter, EuroDIG Secretariat

Name of Remote Moderator(s): 
TBC
Gender Report Card
Please estimate the overall number of women participants present at the session: 
About half of the participants were women
To what extent did the session discuss gender equality and/or women's empowerment?: 
It was not seen as related to the session theme and was not raised
Please include any comments or recommendations you have on how to improve the inclusion of issues related to gender equality and: 

EuroDIG stated in the session principles (http://www.eurodig.org/eurodig-2012/information/session-principles)
"Ensure gender and stakeholder balanced dialogue. In the reporting of your session, we would invite you to provide information about the numbers of women and men participating, and if possible as to the balance of government, business, civil society and other communities participating."
However sometimes it is hard to find a sufficient number of women for a specific issue, but the IGF process is definetly one example of good practise.

Report
Reported by: 
Wolf Ludwig, EuroDIG Secretariat
A brief substantive summary and the main issues that were raised: 

The EuroDIG Workshop was well attended by around 40 participants. After opening and introduction to the session, the first announcement was the date of the next EuroDIG event in Lisbon what is: 6-7 June 2013. Participants were kindly asked to reserve the date.
 
In the first part of the WS, the Message from Stockholm was presented by a speaker from the host country, followed by some evaluations of achievements compared to previous events (Strasbourg 2008, Geneva 2009, Madrid 2010 and Belgrade 2011). The discussion was opened on further expectations and challenges.
 
In a second part, the Secretariat summarized topics and results from the past EuroDIG planning meeting end of September in Frankfurt, Germany. The main outcomes were a planning schedule and the milestones to Lisbon 2013, further consolidation steps like the creation of the EuroDIG Support Association, outreach and funding coordination. The Milestones to Lisbon were discussed in detail.
 
In the third part of the WS participants presented and discussed ideas and expectations for Lisbon/Portugal 2013. Representatives of the next host country gave a briefing about the venue, particularities and offers by the host country. The EuroDIG 2013 in Lisbon is aimed at a close coordination with stakeholders in the host country as well as a better inclusion of national IGF initiatives in Europe. In the meantime, there are 15 national IGF events all over Europe and some more to be created. With support of the European Commission (EUC) the coordination among those initiatives and with EuroDIG will be further improved.
 
A representative of the EU Commission said: “In a number of European Union Member states a Digital Champion has been appointed and this has been a very useful driver to bring about awareness of Internet issues, improving eā€‘skills and inclusion, and each of them has their own particular interest which is important nationally.  So their participation at a national level, at a EuroDIG level and then, of course, ultimately at this level at the IGF is really very important.  I know that the Romanian digital champion was here and participated at this IGF and this is very helpful to provide the link between the IGF at an international level and also nationally and, of course, at a European level.” 
 

Conclusions and further comments: 

There was agreement that Stockholm constitutes another highlight in the EuroDIG history and Lisbon will envisage some new achievements and not just “more of the same”. As next steps and priorities were announced: Call for topics and agenda proposals – not sessions at this stage – for 2013 (deadline until the end of year), updates of donor material (docs and hand-outs) and participants were invited to support the core team and secretariat in its fundraising endeavours. The next open planning meeting will be convened on 28 – 29 January 2013 in Lisbon to discuss first outlines of a program. Further announcements will be published on the EuroDIG Website and circulated via the Newsletter regularly.

Broadband Measurement and Metrics for a Sustainable Internet

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Status: 
Accepted
Workshop Theme: 
Other Events
Theme Question: 

What IG choices, best practices and technical and policy challenges impact the migration of resources starting to run over IP

Concise Description of Workshop: 

The Internet has been a driver for economic development globally. To continue to maintain and grow the Internet as a force for economic and social development, it is essential to understand broadband networks. Without good data on network performance, regulators, industry leaders, and consumers are operating in the dark. They are unable to responsibly make the decisions that will ensure a sustainable, healthy Internet. Broadband networks are hugely complex, decentralized, and dynamic.

Organiser(s) Name: 

This workshop is being hosted by Meredith Whittaker at Google and Serge Fdida at UPMC

Previous Workshop(s): 

Report is at the bottom of the Workshop description: http://goo.gl/A5UJ7

Submitted Workshop Panelists: 

 
 

  • Vint Cerf, Vice President, Google (Panel Host)
  • Meredith Whittaker, Program Manager, Google Research (Moderator)
  • Timur Friedman, Network and Performance Group, University Pierre et Marie Curie, Sorbonne Universités (France)
  • Ben Scott, Director, Open Technology Institute (Germany)
  • Harald Wium Lie, Senior Analyst, Nexia (Norway)
  • Vasso Gogou, Helenic Post and Telecommunication Commission (Greece)
  • Ruben Bloemgarten, Chokepoint Project (Netherlands)
  • Martin Levy, Director of IPv6 Development, Hurricane Electric
Name of Remote Moderator(s): 
Sarah Falvey, Google
Assigned Panellists: 
Gender Report Card
Please estimate the overall number of women participants present at the session: 
There were very few women participants
To what extent did the session discuss gender equality and/or women's empowerment?: 
It was not seen as related to the session theme and was not raised
Report
Reported by: 
Meredith Whittaker, Program Manager, Google Research
A brief substantive summary and the main issues that were raised: 

This was an interactive panel that involved lively dialog between the audience and the panelists.

Some of the themes covered include:

Openness and open measurement
Open measurement means scientifically replicable results. Measurements must be conducted openly at every step so that researchers and the global internet community can verify their accuracy, and improve the methodologies in time with the complex and dynamic changes continually taking place across networks. Regulators and policy makers must rely on this open, scientifically-verifiable information in order to maintain public trust and accountability.

Globally consistent metrics
The Internet is a network of networks, spanning the globe. There is no single, centralized point from which accurate observation can be conducted. As such measurement must reflect this, crossing boundaries and regions in order to comprise a source of information that represents the state of the Internet as a global whole.  Ensuring that methodologies and measurement infrastructure is consistent globally is important to create an accurate and complete picture of Internet health.

Consumer empowerment
Internet users should have access to a clear source of intelligible information about the way the networks they rely on and pay to access are functioning, and whether a problem they are experiencing is caused by their ISP, another ISP, or an issue elsewhere. Networks must serve individuals and communities, and to do this it is crucial that an accountable source of information about what happens to user data when it traverses networks is made available, creating a standard of user agency and data-based accountability.

Regulatory responsibility
Regulators and those responsible for crafting internet policy must rely on good data. This is a given. Given the complexity and dynamism of the global Internet, it is important that new and scientifically-sound processes for obtaining and ensuring good data be adopted at the regulatory level. Specifically, data gathered on the performance and health of the Internet must be obtained through scientifically-sound methodologies. To ensure that these methodologies keep pace with the changes and idiosyncrasies of global networks, it is crucial that the data and the process by which it is obtained remain open to scrutiny by anyone. Only in this way can the global Internet community collaborate to inform this process, and work together to ensure that the methods for data collection match the reality of changing networks.

Nurturing the multi-stakeholder Internet
The internet is the product of diverse constituencies cooperating in surprising and productive ways across diverse regional and other boundaries. To maintain the Internet as a force for economic and social development, it is crucial that information on how the Internet is performing at all layers be available to these broad constituencies. A multi-stakeholder Internet requires a source of sound, verifiable information available to all stakeholders.

Maintaining user privacy
Data is crucial, and so is protecting individual privacy. With this in mind, the community working on creating and maintaining sources of open data is urged to ensure that measurements that contribute to this knowledge measure networks, and not users. To ensure accurate, scientifically-verifiable, and thus necessarily open data, this challenge must be taken seriously.

Conclusions and further comments: 

Internet policy and stewardship must be founded on an accurate understanding of the functioning and health of the Internet. This workshop explored open network measurement as a means to found a clear, useful, shared understanding that can enable the IGF and the global internet community to create policies that grow and maintain the Internet.

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