(No.69) Teaching Internet Governance in developing countries

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Status: 
Accepted
Workshop Theme: 
Internet Governance for Development [IG4D]
Theme Question: 

Why do developing countries have a low participation in the Internet Governance Process?

Concise Description of Workshop: 

After six successful meetings of the Internet Governance Forum the participation of the developing countries is still very low. This analysis is specially intreresting in Latin America for example. There is usually a 5 to 6 % of participants from this region in the different IGFs. Also in the second IGF that took place in Río de Janeiro, Brazil, there were several local participants but the rest of the region was again underrepresented. In this context, teaching the concepts and the importance of the Internet Governance becomes a key issue if these countries and regions want to actively participate in the global debate and understanding where are the news and tendencies about global Internet governance going. This workshop will analyze the experience of different initiatives that try to close this gap, teaching the concepts of the Internet Governance from al local and regional perspective but at the same time putting these ideas and debates in the light of the global Internet Governance Debate. Some of the aspects that the workshop will try to address are the language barrier, the local reality and its distance to the global debate, the relevant involvement of some national governments in these initiatives, the main achievements and conclusions that can be shared after several years of work done. Based on the experience, the workshop will try to answer this questions going through this agenda:
 
WORKSHOP AGENDA
 
- Why developing countries do not participate in the Internet Governance global debate?
- Which are the main barriers to their participation? Is it only related with economic reasons?
- Why there are governments that embraced this activities to empower the local community to participating in the Internet Governance debate? Colombia is a great example of this, being the host of the biggest and most successful South School on Internet Governance, SSIG 2012, that trained 120 fellows.
- Review the achievements after these years of training activities. - Review the future of Internet Governance teaching process.
- Closing remarks, next events, next steps.   All the panellist have been involved in these activities, both as faculty members and or as organizers.

Organiser(s) Name: 

Organiser: South School on Internet Governance - SSIG
Olga Cavalli Director SSIG Olga Cavalli is a university teacher, Director of SSIG, advisor of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Argentina, ISOC Argentina board member, among other activities.

Submitted Workshop Panelists: 

Olga Cavalli - Director South School on Internet Governance. University teacher and director of the online Internet Governance course of the Organization of American States OAS (Confirmed).
 
Pedro Less Andrade - Senior Policy Counsel Latin America - Google (confirmed)
 
Gorka Orueta - University of País Vasco (Confirmed - Remote)
 
Jorge Vega Iracelay - Senior Director of Legal Affairs - Microsoft Mexico (confirmed)
 
Iván Sanchez Medina - Commissioner National Commission of Communications of Colombia (confirmed)
Eduardo Santoyo, Vice President of Corporate Affairs and Country Manager for the ccTLD .CO, and President of the LACTLD board of directors (Confirmed)
 
Ricardo Pedraza - Verisign Director Business Development Latin America (confirmed)
 
Avri Doria - SSIG core Faculty member  (confirmed)
 
Bill Drake - University of Zurich (Confirmed)
 
Adrián Carballo - SSIG - South School on Internet Governance (Confirmed)
 
Wolfgang Kleinwaechter - University of Aharus (Confirmed)
 
Beatriz Lopez Crespo - Advisor Cyber Security for children (Confirmed)

Name of Remote Moderator(s): 
Malebogo Khanda - Gaborone - Botswana
Gender Report Card
Please estimate the overall number of women participants present at the session: 
About half of the participants were women
To what extent did the session discuss gender equality and/or women's empowerment?: 
It was mentioned briefly in the presentations and discussions
Please include any comments or recommendations you have on how to improve the inclusion of issues related to gender equality and: 

The audience was divided among several simultaneous activities so it was difficult to measure gender involvement and other audience related issues.

Report
Reported by: 
Olga Cavalli, Director South School on Internet Governance
A brief substantive summary and the main issues that were raised: 

 
This workshop analyzed the experience of different initiatives that try to bring new participants into the I* organizations (ISOC; IETF; ICANN; IGF) teaching the concepts of the Internet Governance from al local and regional perspective but at the same time putting these ideas and debates in the light of the global Internet Governance Debate. Some of the aspects that the workshop addressed were the language barrier, the local reality and its distance to the global debate, the relevant involvement of some national governments in these initiatives, the main achievements and conclusions that can be shared after several years of work done.
Panelists:
·       Pedro Less Andrade - Senior Policy Counsel Latin America – Google
·       Gorka Orueta - University of País Vasco (remote)
·       Bill Woodcock – Packet Clearing House
·       Eduardo Santoyo, Vice President of Corporate Affairs and Country Manager for the ccTLD .CO, and President of the LACTLD board of directors
·       Ricardo Pedraza - Verisign Director Business Development Latin America
·       Avri Doria - SSIG core Faculty member
·       Wolfgang Kleinwaechter - University of Aharus
Organizer: Olga Cavalli - Director South School on Internet Governance. Secretary ISOC Argentina Chapter
www.gobernanzainternet.org

Conclusions and further comments: 

- Panellists explained their different involvement in Internet Governance teaching activities and the advantages that they find in them in relation with the involvement of developing countries.
- SSIG, South School on Internet Governance main mission is to increase the relevant participation of Latin American and Caribbean representatives in debate and participation spaces where the Internet Governance is discussed. The South School on internet governance:

  • Creates a capacity building program for new leaders of oppinion that encourages them to actively participate in meetings and debates where the future of the Internet is decided.
  • Trains professionals in the Latin American and Caribbean region in those issues related with the Internet Governance in each of their countries.
  • Motivates young students of the Latin American and Caribbean region to actively get inolved in the development of the internatoinal policies related with Internet and related issues.

All students recieve a full fellowship to attend, there is full simultaneous translation English Spanish in all sessions.
SSIG rotates among countries of the region in order to allow higher local involvement in a region which is big and it is expensive to travel iside it.
First SSIG was held in 2009 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, then 2010 Sao Paulo, Brazil, 2011 in Mexico DF; 2012 in Bogotá, Colombia and next will take place in April 2013 in Panama.
The program has trained more than 300 professionals so far, many of them are very much involved in different IG activities, which is the main objective of this training innitiative.
- The Euro SSIG takes place every year in Meissen, Germany, and there come students from all over the world, it does not have a specific focus on regions or developing countries, but they do participate as well.
The program takes place in a very quiet and nice location in Meissen, where the atmosphere makes teaching more insightful.
The program will take place next year again in July.
- Faculty members see advantages in both models of the School, the European in one place and the Latin American with the rotation and more involvement of the local community. Both have advantages for the participants.
- From the experience, training programs about Internet Governance must be reviewed every year and they have to address the needs of the participants,which are the issues that interest them and try to focus in them. The approach must be practical more than theory.
- Packet Clearing House is an operational organisation much more than a research or academic organisation, they organize between 70 and 100 workshops each year and those are almost all aimed at solving some kind of operational problem.  A lot of those are about Internet governance. PCH has four main areas of work.  They support Internet exchange points and peering and traffic exchange, they support the core of the domain name system, they support regulatory and policy work, and security co‑ordination.
PCH educate operators on how to work with law enforcement, to take down a DOS attack or ISP operators on how to keep port stability on their switches.
Tension is on the one hand the safety of the status quo and on the other hand the advantages for development. At some level, most people understand that they can't exactly have both.  If they want new technology and the benefits of new technology and modernity, they have to give up some of the things that they are used to that are not necessarily better, they are just safe and convenient and they have become habituated to. A huge amount of work goes at ministerial and regulator level.
- Universities should de more involved in these teaching innitiatives.
- Involvement of governments was seen as an advantage for local understanding of the Internet Governance issues.
- The SSIG had remote participation for participants in 2012 in Bogota, and usually those faculty members that cannot attend in person make a remote presentation. The quality of the remote participation must be always the best that can be achieved in order to allow broader and better involvement of the interested community.
- Other innitiatives mentioned: Project Guttenberg, knowledgeunlatched.org, Brewster Cale's Digital Open Library, openlibrary.org.